Code of Conduct

Persons carrying on lobbying activities shall have regard to the following principles:

1)     Demonstrating Respect for Public Bodies

Persons carrying on lobbying activities should act in a manner that demonstrates respect for the democratic process; for democratic institutions and for public bodies, including the duty of elected and other public officials to serve the public interest.  A person carrying on lobbying activities should not act in a manner that shows disrespect for the democratic process; for democratic institutions or for public bodies, and should refrain from directly or indirectly exerting undue pressure on an elected or appointed public official.

 

Persons carrying on lobbying activities should not expect preferential access or treatment from public officials based on the person’s identity or on a former or existing relationship[1] with the elected or appointed public official.  Persons carrying on lobbying activities should not seek to abuse or exploit such relationships.

 

A person who, by virtue of their membership of a Committee, Advisory Group, Task Force etc. has preferential or exceptional access to elected or public officials, should not use their membership to seek preferential treatment for themselves or the organisation/body they may be representing.

 

2)     Acting with Honesty and Integrity

Persons carrying on lobbying activities should conduct all relations with public bodies and elected or appointed public officials with honesty and integrity.  Persons carrying on lobbying activities should not seek to obtain information or influence decisions dishonestly or by use of improper means or influence.  Persons carrying on lobbying activities should make their case without manipulating or presenting information in ways that could be regarded as dishonest, misleading or false.

 

Persons carrying on lobbying activities should not knowingly make misleading, exaggerated or extravagant claims about, or otherwise misrepresent, the nature or extent of their access to elected or appointed public officials. 

 

Persons carrying on lobbying activities shouldavoid any conduct or practices likely to bring discredit upon themselves, the persons they represent or the public bodies they are contacting.

 

 

[1] For example a personal or family relationship or having worked together on electoral campaigns.

 

3)     Ensuring Accuracy of Information

Persons carrying on lobbying activities should take all reasonable measures to satisfy themselves that the information they are providing to public bodies or to elected or appointed public officials is accurate and factual.

 

If a person carrying on lobbying activities considers that there is a material change in factual information previously provided and the person believes that the public body or elected or appointed public official may still be relying on the previous information, the person should, insofar as is practicable, provide accurate and updated information to the public body or to the elected or appointed public official.

 

For the purposes of transparency, persons carrying on lobbying activities are encouraged to make public, where possible, any information used to support their lobbying activities.

 

4)     Disclosure of Identity and Purpose of Lobbying Activities to Public Bodies and Elected or Appointed Officials

A person carrying on lobbying activities should always identify themselves by name and, where applicable, the body or bodies they work for. Where a person is carrying on lobbying activities on behalf of a client or other person, the person carrying on the lobbying activities should disclose the identity of the client or other person, the nature of their relationship with that person or organisation and the client’s/organisation’s interests in the matter.

 

A person carrying on lobbying activities must not conceal or try to conceal the identity of a client, business or organisation whose interests they are representing.

 

A person carrying on lobbying activities should always inform the elected or appointed public official of any personal interests they may have in the matter.  They should also make clear the objectives or aims they promote (or those of the client they represent) and the purpose and intended results of the communication.